Abcess Care

An abscess is formed from a wound that heals quickly trapping bacteria under the skin, which lead to pockets that fill with pus. 

Addison's Disease

Because of the numerous symptoms that can be seen with Addison's disease, Addison's disease has earned the medical nickname The Great Imitator. You would think that you could simply look for an increase in potassium and/or drop in sodium on a basic laboratory blood panel, but it turns out spot checks of electrolyte values like this are not reliable enough for a diagnosis of Addison's disease.

Airborne Allergies

Everyone knows someone with hay fever. Airborne pollens, molds, dust particles, etc. are inhaled and soon the sneezing and sniffling begins. A simple way to think of atopy for pets would be simply saying that the pet inhales an airborne allergen but instead of sneezing and sniffling, the pet gets itchy skin.

 

Alopecia

Alopecia is the medical term for baldness. A particular type of baldness has been described in the Nordic or double-coated breeds whereby the dog develops symmetrical coat loss on the trunk as well as darkly pigmented skin in the bald areas.

Arthritis

Degenerative joint disease is the number one cause of chronic pain in dogs and cats. The condition is the result of long-term stresses on a joint, either resulting from an old injury or from natural development of a poorly conformed joint.

Aural Hematoma

A hematoma is swelling created by a broken blood vessel after bleeding has occurred inside a tissue. Hematomas in the earflaps (aural hematomas) occur when head shaking breaks a blood vessel within the earflap.

Campylobacter

Bacterial diarrheas are generally a nuisance for the adult animal but can be lethal to a small puppy, kitten, or even a human baby.  Most of these problems stem from contaminated food or fecal contaminated environment. 

Cataracts

Cataracts can be congenital (born with it), age-related; of genetic origin (the most common cause); caused by trauma; by dietary deficiency (some kitten milk replacement formulas have been implicated); by electric shock; or by toxin. The patient with a cataract is not able to see through the opacity. If the entire lens is involved, the eye will be blind.

Cherry Eye

In the smaller breeds -- especially Boston terriers, Cocker spaniels, bulldogs and beagles -- the gland of the third eyelid is not strongly held in place. The gland falls down (prolapses) out to where the owner notices it as a reddened mass. Out of its normal position, the gland does not circulate blood properly and may swell.

Clostridium

In the smaller breeds -- especially Boston terriers, Cocker spaniels, bulldogs and beagles -- the gland of the third eyelid is not strongly held in place. The gland falls down (prolapses) out to where the owner notices it as a reddened mass. Out of its normal position, the gland does not circulate blood properly and may swell.

Corneal Ulcer

The cornea is the transparent, shiny membrane which makes up the front of the eyeball. Think of it as a clear window. 

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is the most common cause of hind-limb lameness in dogs. It causes severe knee pain and instability. 

Cushings

Cushing's disease is one of the more common endocrine diseases that affect dogs, but it rarely occurs in cats. Although it is not life threatening, its side effects often lead pet owners to consider euthanasia if control cannot be maintained. 

Cuterebriasis

Cuterebriasis is caused by a fly called Cuterebra. The parasite infests small mammals that spend time outdoors, such as dogs, cats, rabbits, ferrets, squirrels, and rodents. Cuterebra are large non-feeding flies that lay eggs near animal burrows, nests, or vegetation.

Demodectic

Demodectic mange (unlike sarcoptic mange) is not considered a contagious disease and isolation of affected dogs is generally not considered necessary. That said, there are some circumstances under which the mites could spread from one dog to another. Classically Demodex mites have been felt to only be transferable from mother to newborn pup.

Diabetes

The cells of the body require a sugar known as glucose for food and they depend on the bloodstream to bring glucose to them. They cannot, however, absorb and utilize glucose without a hormone known as insulin. This hormone, insulin, is produced by the pancreas. Insulin is like a key that unlocks the door to separate cells from the sugars in our bloodstream.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is one of the most extreme complications of diabetes mellitus that can be experienced. Unfortunately, most cases of ketoacidosis are in patients that were not previously known to be diabetic so the owner (and pet) must deal with two serious diagnoses: one acutely life-threatening and expensive and the other requiring on-going commitment and daily treatment.

Disk Disease

here are two types of disease that can afflict the intervertebral disk causing the disk to press painfully against the spinal cord: Hansen Type I Disk Disease and Hansen Type II Disk Disease. In Type I, the nucleus pulposus becomes calcified (mineralized). A wrong jump by the patient causes the rock-like disk material to shoot out of the annulus fibrosus. If the disk material shoots upward, it will press painfully on the ligament above and potentially cause compression of the spinal cord further above.

Ear Cleaning

Proper ear cleaning is an importment part of the treatment plan.

Ear Mites

Ear mites are tiny infectious organisms resembling microscopic ticks. The mite can just barely be seen as a small white dot with the naked eye but usually must be detected by examination of a sample of ear wax under a microscope.

Elbow Dysplasia

Elbow dysplasia is the most common cause of front limb lameness in the young dog, especially of the larger breeds. 

Fatty Liver

This information was developed to assist cat owners whose pets have been diagnosed with fatty liver, or for whom fatty liver is being considered as a possible complication of another problem. Briefly, lipidosis is considered as a cause or contributing cause of liver failure when a cat that was once overweight loses weight too quickly.

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common acquired heart diseases in cats but very rare in dogs.  HCM is a primary heart muscle disease where the muscular walls of the ventricles become abnormally thickened (hypertrophied.)  The name hypertrophic cardiomyopathy literally means “thick heart muscle disease.

 

Feline Idiopathic Cystitis

Feline lower urinary tract disease, or feline idiopathic cystitis, is the term describing the following group of clinical signs:

  • bloody urine

  • straining to urinate (can easily be mistaken for straining to defecate)

  • urinating in unusual places

  • urinary blockage (almost exclusively a male cat problem and constitutes an emergency)

  • licking the urinary opening (usually due to pain).

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

FIV stands for feline immunodeficiency virus, just as HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus.

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD)

Feline lower urinary tract disease or FLUTD describes the following group of clinical signs:

  • bloody urine

  • straining to urinate (can easily be mistaken for straining to defecate)

  • urinating in unusual places

  • urinary blockage (almost exclusively a male cat problem)

  • licking the urinary opening (usually due to pain)

Giardia

Giardia is the genus of a protozoan parasite that is infectious to both humans and pets all over the world.  Giardia consists of flagellates, which mean they move by means of several whip-like structures called flagella.

Glomerulonephritis

Most of the time when kidney disease is discussed, renal insufficiency or chronic kidney failure is the subject. 

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